If you want to please House of Gucci don’t look at it in its original language








It may seem absurd not to recommend seeing a film in its original version and we Italians (lovers of dubbing) know how much we get lost, out of laziness, watching the dubbed versions of the great titles on the big and small screen. In almost all cases, in fact, serial and cinematographic products, if seen in their native language, offer a range of emotions, jokes, details that in dubbing, inevitably, are lost and to lose them would be a shame, almost like seeing a version. reduced and simplified. With regard to House of Gucci, however, this is not the case because in Ridley Scott’s new film on the history of the Gucci family there is a great problem of “language”. If you want to like this film, do not watch it in the original language even if the curiosity to listen to the Italianized accent of Lady Gaga (who seems to have trained a lot, together with the rest of the cast, to get it) is great. Too bad that this idea of ​​making the actors of the film speak in an Italianized English is not at all credible, on the contrary, in some moments it is almost a parody.


For heaven’s sake, we appreciate the commitment of Lady Gaga and above all that of the most chameleonic actor of the American star system, Jared Leto (a little less that of Adam Driver) but we must admit that this choice of giving the Italian accent to Maurizio Gucci , Patrizia Reggiani and the rest of the family just don’t work. It is a contradiction to see Italian characters who live in Italy speak English among themselves, inserting here and there some stereotypes of the Italian language and accentuating an excessively marked cadence in their English speech.


All the effort that these actors made to correctly pronounce “Maurizio” or “Patrizia”, ​​”espresso” or “ciao bella” could have been spared by speaking as they normally speak so much that we are in Italy and that the characters are Italian you understand it anyway. The fact of choosing an Italianized English full of clichés as the language of the film adds nothing to the story of these characters, indeed it takes away. It takes away credibility, it takes away empathy, it also takes away from the actors the possibility of expressing themselves at their best in their interpretation, always being committed to recreating the perfect Italianized English which, as an (Italian) spectator, distracts a lot from the story and immediately brings out that narrative fiction in which you should get lost watching a movie.


Not to mention the countless stereotypes about Italy in this film which at times seems almost a parody (made with love) by the Americans towards our country which, unfortunately, however, have not yet understood that we do not call coffee “espresso” , but they, after all, like it like this and even this film, in fact, will most likely only like them (and those who watch it in dubbed version).












If you want to please House of Gucci don’t look at it in its original language