HCE: 5 years after #MeToo, let’s move on to Act II, violence cannot go unpunished

A 33% increase in sexual violence1; of the complaints filed by less than 10% of victims ; 80% of complaints closed without follow-up whose only 1% result in a criminal conviction. Five years after #MeToo, the results are instructive.

Women around the world have testified to the sexist and sexual violence they have been or are facing: rape, sexual assault, harassment, sexist remarks… Revelations have multiplied in all sectors, revealing the systemic nature of sexist and sexual violence in France. But this formidable act I of freedom of speech did not lead to act II of its treatment and appropriate sanctions. It’s time to ring the hour of recovery.

For the victims, it is indeed a double penalty: they suffered violence and did not obtain reparation. Complaints are increasing, violence is not decreasing and their treatment remains largely unpunished. If part of this increase is due to the liberation of listening and speaking, sexual and gender-based violence is worsening. The High Council for Equality demands that the victims be heard, believed and that the perpetrators be condemned.

The High Council is concerned about the 40% reduction in criminal convictions for rape2 which is explained by an unacceptable reclassification of crimes as offenses and testifies to a glaring lack of means, training and understanding of the mechanisms of violence among the professionals responsible for collecting, instructing and condemning them.

The HCE calls for dealing with rape cases for what they are and strongly opposes the reclassification of rape as a crime.

It recommends adapting the reception and management of complaints as well as the judicial system to the sexual violence of which women are massively victims.

At a time when the budget is being discussed, it is necessary to provide all the means necessary for the care of victims of violence, the financing of associations that support them and the functioning of the legal and police system. Spain has acquired the means to match its ambitions and has obtained results. France must draw inspiration from it.

For Sylvie Pierre-Brossolette, President of the High Council for Equality: “ The violence of which women are victims is neither well received, nor well treated, nor well punished. This cannot last without the women eventually giving in to discouragement and anger. We must unlock the means to act as quickly as possible. »

High Council for Equality

5 years after #MeToo, let’s move on to Act II: violence cannot go unpunished

A 33% increase in sexual violence1; of the complaints filed by less than 10% of victims ; 80% of complaints closed without follow-up whose only 1% result in a criminal conviction. Five years after #MeToo, the results are instructive.

Women around the world have testified to the sexist and sexual violence they have been or are facing: rape, sexual assault, harassment, sexist remarks… Revelations have multiplied in all sectors, revealing the systemic nature of sexist and sexual violence in France. But this formidable act I of freedom of speech did not lead to act II of its treatment and appropriate sanctions. It’s time to ring the hour of recovery.

For the victims, it is indeed a double penalty: they suffered violence and did not obtain reparation. Complaints are increasing, violence is not decreasing and their treatment remains largely unpunished. If part of this increase is due to the liberation of listening and speaking, sexual and gender-based violence is worsening. The High Council for Equality demands that the victims be heard, believed and that the perpetrators be condemned.

The High Council is concerned about the 40% reduction in criminal convictions for rape2 which is explained by an unacceptable reclassification of crimes as offenses and testifies to a glaring lack of means, training and understanding of the mechanisms of violence among the professionals responsible for collecting, instructing and condemning them.

The HCE calls for dealing with rape cases for what they are and strongly opposes the reclassification of rape as a crime.

It recommends adapting the reception and management of complaints as well as the judicial system to the sexual violence of which women are massively victims.

At a time when the budget is being discussed, it is necessary to provide all the means necessary for the care of victims of violence, the financing of associations that support them and the functioning of the legal and police system. Spain has acquired the means to match its ambitions and has obtained results. France must draw inspiration from it.

For Sylvie Pierre-Brossolette, President of the High Council for Equality: “ The violence of which women are victims is neither well received, nor well treated, nor well punished. This cannot last without the women eventually giving in to discouragement and anger. We must unlock the means to act as quickly as possible. »

HCE: 5 years after #MeToo, let’s move on to Act II, violence cannot go unpunished – 50 – 50 Magazine