Operation Fortune: the great disappointment’, review: Guy Ritchie at the best of his returns

One of the most surprising points of Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointmentof Guy Ritchie, is his sense of humor. Certainly not in a parodic, intellectual or cynical way. The film, which is coming to the big screen after several delays due to the pandemic, is poking fun at itself. From the familiar Ritchie formula (action, big choreographed fights, pompous heroes) throughout.

In fact, the first sequence of Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointment (which drives through Madrid airport in the tone of a spy movie) celebrates its neat impulse. But, at the same time, something else: are the jokes and gags gimmicks to support the plot, attention-grabbing elements to drive something else? Ritchie is unclear and moves with astonishing speed to cover his most familiar scenarios.

And also to make you laugh. So for the first twenty minutes, the inevitable big question is whether or not… the plot uses humor as a triggerFrom what, from the personality of its characters, from the subplot at the heart of what seems to be a typical one-man army film? Nothing is very clear in this story where each point has an artificial tone, a kind of twisted joke that becomes more complex as the plot progresses.

Operation Fortune: The Great Deception, Poster

Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointment

One of the most surprising aspects of Fortune: The Great Deception of Guy Ritchie is his sense of humor. The film, which is coming to the big screen after several delays due to the pandemic, is poking fun at itself. From the familiar Ritchie formula (action, big choreographed fights, pompous heroes). Indeed, the opening sequence (crossing Madrid airport to the tune of a spy movie) celebrates its thrilling pulp. But, at the same time, something else: are the jokes and gags gimmicks to support the plot, attention-grabbing elements to drive something else? Ritchie is unclear and moves with astonishing speed to cover his most familiar scenarios.

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Score: 4 out of 5.

Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointmenta sophisticated double tower

Of course, the mocking perspective on cinema is one of Ritchie’s strengths and always has been. He never takes any of his films seriously.. But in Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointmentthe effect is clearer. So much so that from its first sequences – in which it parodies Mission Impossible – it is inevitable that the film will be a curious mixture.

On the one hand, the satire that turns into pure action. Nathan Jasmine (Cary Elwes) recruits a team to take a big risk. It does so in an introductory sequence that recalls Ritchie’s talent for using the camera as an agile, uplifting narrator.

The script’s attention shifts back and forth as Jasmine introduces her team. But, of course, the focal point of the attraction is Orson Fortune (Jason Statham), who returns under the director in top form. Even more astonishing, Ritchie knows that his favorite actor is emblematic of a certain rhythm of his intrigues. On Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointmentit is more than obvious. When Fortune appears on the scene, the rest of the cast seems to be overshadowed. They also seem to revolve around his energy.

Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointmentwhich escapes the commonplaces of action cinema, is a collection of nuances that surprises with its intelligence, especially when it adds self-parody in a brilliant tone that gives substantial dimension to the central dilemma. In particular by adding self-parody in a brilliant tone which gives a substantial dimension to the central dilemma: how to deceive a billionaire known for his ruthlessness? By using a type of bait that a charismatic, narcissistic villain can’t resist: a well-known actor.

This is where the film finds its best point. Danny Francesco (Josh Hartnett) is a famous actor in big action movies and always on the verge of stardom. The reference is obvious, and Ritchie uses Harnett (considered for years Hollywood’s great frustrated promise) as a symbol of many things running parallel.

Operation Fortune: The Great DisappointmentOperation Fortune: The Great Disappointment

On the one hand, from the character of Fortune himself, who transforms Statham into the quintessential hero of great ridiculous action epics.. At the other extreme, a mockery of Hollywood and its promises of instant fame.

Between the two, the director manages to balance Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointment On a clever premise with a frantic, well-constructed pace. Of the heist movie Ritchie does what he does best with a hard-nosed eye on crime. Build a story with multiple points of view, in which brilliant direction supports a dynamic and well-thought-out scenario.

The sinister villain Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointment

Of course, every great story depends on its villain, and Greg Simmonds of Hugh Grant is perhaps one of the strongest points. of Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointment. The actor, who is experiencing a revival based on self-parody, becomes from the third part of the film the central point of interest. It’s also a way of justifying Ritchie’s eccentric decisions about what he wants to tell.

This violent, ruthless, yet elegant arms dealer is perhaps the essence of this Ritchie experiment, which succeeds in its ability to surprise. Halfway between the ordinary action movie and the sophisticated journey through narrative risks, Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointment triumph.

Hugh Grant in Operation Fortune: The Great DisappointmentHugh Grant in Operation Fortune: The Great Disappointment

He does this for his undisguised ability to poke fun at the genre. And, at the same time, to have enough momentum to be, despite everything, a production with an undeniable personality. Ritchie has returned to what he does best, which his fans – and the action movie world – are no doubt grateful to him for.

Operation Fortune: the great disappointment’, review: Guy Ritchie at the best of his returns