Anxieties and miseries….

In this country that belongs to everyone except the Lebanese, we have had to come to terms with reality by saying to ourselves: “Patience, time will eventually fix things. Wonderful fatalism that helps us, despite the economic situation and the deterioration of the situation, to take our troubles patiently. And yet, no clearing on the horizon. A new year begins, and we are still torn by an instinct for self-preservation and by an irrepressible desire to live.

We live in precariousness, and lasting stability is denied us by those who have sworn to our downfall. What suffering to see all the communities pitted against each other instead of forming a model of understanding and tolerance!

How to mop up so much hatred, erase so much resentment when verbal abuse is at its peak? What credit to give to a government (and we are in full vacancy) which boasts of national unity and whose members are hostile to each other? Isn’t it rather a committee where turpitudes are juxtaposed and where resentments are assembled?

No one could believe that our leaders would really intend to dialogue or to work to bring the nation out of the ordeal it is going through. The Lebanese are used to conclaves: the participants agree on a set of general principles that are vague enough to allow for various interpretations, general enough not to engage anyone’s responsibility. What courteous remarks exchanged between the pear and the cheese, to the point that the people wonder if it is the same leaders who are carrying out dazzling verbal escalations.

In a mess of mistrust, how to demand from the people an increase in confidence, how could intransigence turn out to be a requirement?

It seems that the Lebanese, yet so intelligent and astute, can no longer overcome the psychological barrier of certain attitudes, nor overcome what opposes them to each other. Their moral courage no longer matches their intelligence. They seem to give reason to these verses of Corneille in Polyeucte: “The source of my hatred is too inexhaustible… Like my days, I will make it last… I want to live with it, expire with it. »

Should we, on the threshold of a new year, be unrepentant optimists or weary of being skeptics? Should we reflect the image of a nation always faithful to itself, but of a political class no less faithful to its immediate interests which are often in contradiction with those of the state?

All these leaders who meet, chat, have a hearty lunch and never agree: what’s the point? Let us first be assured of water, electricity, medicine… a minimum of organization, a little less anarchy and a little more security… Total corruption!

Humiliated, frustrated, martyred, we Lebanese, during these years of endless catastrophes, how could we believe in the effectiveness of politics, of power?

We expect a government commensurate with our tragedies, our anxieties and our miseries. One has the impression of attending a surrealist performance where the comic is the faithful companion of the tragic. It looks like a film by Pasolini or Fellini, with more grotesqueness and less depth.

We are experiencing a real crisis of confidence. A distressing parody summed up so well by this sentence from Ionesco: “The comic being the intuition of the absurd, it seems to me more hopeless than the tragic. »

How can we believe in the resurrection of Lebanon as long as its leaders no longer speak the language of reason but that of passionate logic and exclusion, intransigence and fanaticism? Is it still possible to see Lebanon reborn as believed by our humanists and which is the deep aspiration – what haunting nostalgia – of the majority of Lebanese? Here is what Michel Chiha writes in Face and Presence of Lebanon: “In this world of values ​​where the spirit has the leading role and which makes the elites, what we love, what we are looking for, is no longer the material thing, it is the substance and the force of the speech, it is the smoothness of the judgment and the glance, it is the height of the sights, it is the moral quality. »

How not to succumb to the nostalgia which is the negation of the Lebanon of today at the same time as the diffuse awareness of the Lebanon of yesteryear?

“Whoever feels isolated like a stranger among strangers and like the melancholy survivor of a defunct era feels by the same solidarity of another city, of another fatherland, of an invisible city, of a republic distant. (Vladimir Jankelevitch).

A new Year ? Let us listen through the branches to the golden sound of a tree that does not want to die!

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In this country that belongs to everyone except the Lebanese, we have had to come to terms with reality by saying to ourselves: “Patience, time will eventually fix things. Wonderful fatalism that helps us, despite the economic situation and the deterioration of the situation, to take our troubles patiently. And yet, no enlightenment to…

Anxieties and miseries….