A student occupation is trivial, but interrupting it for the bridge is foolish

The mobilization of political science in Rome was suspended for the feast of All sorts of thingsie will resume after the vacation. By now every important issue, from the fight against global warming to that for civil rights, is now ridiculed and reduced to a parody, a dark and grotesque caricature

There is nothing more difficult today than protesting. Meanwhile, a distinction should be made between protest and complaint – the border is increasingly blurred, especially since social media have given a megaphone to every single cause (and to every single effect, even minimal). We live in times in which the distinction becomes an instance, and the whim is claimed as a universal principle. Moreover, more and more often top positions are occupied by those who exercise power “against”: usually against imaginary enemies, windmills, or directly against reality. The protest has therefore become institutionalized, and has become conformist. What’s more: with populism, protest has become a form of government. And expressing one’s dissent against this culture of indignation requires a radical rethinking of antagonism.

Forms of protest are today banal at best; in the worst – and most widespread – stupid and ridiculous. In fact, the occupation of a university faculty as a form of protest is banal; ridiculous that the occupation of political science in Rome that began on Tuesday 26 October was suspended for the All Saints’ Bridge to resume after the vacation. The thoughtful middle class is questioning in the press as to why, with a concrete nuclear apocalypse in the horizon of eventualities, no one takes to the streets to protest. Nihilism, tragic indifference; they argue. But won’t it be that a demonstration would be useless? What does a square do to him, even if it is full of people, against the atomic bomb? If anything, it can only act as a sensitive target. We are mostly powerless in the face of the world around us; taking note of our lack of influence in the face of certain issues beyond our reach is not a form of cynicism, but rather of maturity. Let me be clear, there are reasons to be dissatisfied and to protest; but we are shocked at the increasingly frequent combination between good causes and abysmal stupidity, between civil battles and sensational stupidity.

Every important issue, from the fight against global warming to raising awareness for the recognition and expansion of civil rights, is now ridiculed, reduced to a parody, a dark and grotesque caricature.. If this continues, the future will hold news like this: “The other morning two activists went to Cracco, the famous chef’s restaurant in Milan, and threw a watercolor painting into a soup to protest world hunger. and food shortages. Carlo Cracco made it known that the soup was not damaged, as the plate was protected by a series of glass glasses and goblets, but that the Murano service was destroyed. The two activists, aged 20 and 21, both British, took off both jackets during the demonstration to show T-shirts with the words’Just Stop Eat Oil‘, the name of the nutritionist and health group to which they belong and which is fighting for a drastic reduction in the use of oil and other saturated fats in the kitchen. It is not the first time that activists and activists of ‘Just Stop Eat Oil’ organize protests in restaurants to try to create awareness on issues related to malnutrition or poor diet. Last July two of them stuck to the cutlery of Massimo Bottura’s Osteria Francescana in Modena, while others ran away without paying the bill in various starred restaurants around Europe ”.

A student occupation is trivial, but interrupting it for the bridge is foolish