Bolsonaro did not claim to have evidence of a “scandalous fraud” in the Brazilian elections

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Reinvention, the process to be informed in Venezuela

Caracas, Nov 2 (EFE).- A group of adolescents from Petare, the largest favela in Venezuela, meet in a room at the headquarters of the Metropolitan University (Unimet) to receive training in journalism, with the aim of transmitting news about their communities, in the face of massive closures of traditional media by the authorities. The adolescents, between 12 and 18 years old, are part of the “Sala de Influencers” program, an initiative of the Alianza Rebelde Investiga (ARI) -made up of the digital media TalCual, Runrunes and El Pitazo-, together with the Center for Integrated Arts from Unimet, where they will receive journalistic training based on freedom of expression, democracy, human dignity and human rights. The coordinator Carmen Riera explained to EFE that the objective is to be able to reinforce these issues, so that they can identify “fake news” and become influential people by reporting on their communities. The name of the show, she continued, is a nod to the current trends of youth following influencers on social media. “That they learn from a young age that they can be like those people they see as distant, but learning how the news should be treated, the responsibility that is to give information (…) and, therefore, empower them as people” she added. Mireya Achrich, another of the coordinators of “Sala de Influencers”, explained to EFE that after the covid-19 pandemic there was “a lot” of school dropouts, so she believes that working on these issues in this way may be more significant than in a formal class in their schools. LOCAL STORY WITH INNOVATION Teenagers will attend a weekly class until March of next year, when they will deliver a job in which they will review up to five news items from their communities in any format. “We are also going to encourage innovation, because here, at the Integrated Arts Center, they are also learning, for example, percussion, theater, singing, they can make the news from a song (…) through a play, make a normal newspaper or a video,” said Riera. The result will be published in the ARI media, another goal, according to Achrich, being that this can be maintained beyond the project and that the adolescents constantly transmit information. “The idea is that they can become a kind of reporters and influencers for their own community, who can constantly transmit positive information, based on truth and reliability,” Achrich said. A RADIO THAT TRIES TO FILL GAPS To this initiative, “Radio Democracia” is added, developed by the NGO Instituto Prensa y Sociedad (Ipys), with 10 stories in podcast format, dedicated to issues that affect the states of Apure, Bolívar, Falcón, Guárico , Merida, Tachira and Zulia. The director of Ipys, Marianela Balbi, told EFE that this project arose after the “Atlas del Silencio” study in which “information deserts” were identified, that is, rural or urban regions that do not have information media. “We devised this program, which we call Radio Democracia, because what it wants is to try to repopulate those news deserts, where there is no longer any local information, where people increasingly find themselves without the possibility of a means of communication. by which to know the news but also express their problems,” he said. “These are stories that are not being handled in the media, that are not known, that are not in the public debate and that are local stories that stay there and precisely what we want is to experiment with new narratives, with a new way of reaching them. to the people,” he added. These stories tell of the difficulties suffered by cancer patients, the seven hours that a woman walked to give birth and died, the migration between Venezuela and Colombia, the abuse of authority, as well as the “inaction” of the institutions in the face of the remains archaeological sites of an indigenous community. CLOSURES THAT GROW The National Union of Press Workers (SNTP) counted, between January and October, the closure of 95 radio stations -the medium most followed by Venezuelans- in 16 states, according to Ipys and the NGO Espacio Público . Balbi stated that most closures are treated as administrative procedures that are notified by the National Telecommunications Commission (Conatel) through telephone calls. Since 2013, Ipys has recorded the closure of 104 forms. Saraí Coscojuela (c) Agencia EFE

Bolsonaro did not claim to have evidence of a “scandalous fraud” in the Brazilian elections