The en plein of Trump’s “conspiracy theorists”. But the tycoon’s trial doesn’t stop

The hearings of the Commission investigating the assault on the Capitol on January 6, 2021 do not affect Donald Trump’s hold on Republican voters. In Tuesday’s primary round, the candidates backed by the former president scored a string of successes, proving that the tycoon’s hold on the Grand Old Party remains as strong as ever.

In Nevada all the candidates he endorsed have won, including Adam Laxalt for the Senate (he is the former attorney general who led The Donald’s efforts in the state to overturn the 2020 results), and Jim Marchant as secretary of state. (who insisted on voting conspiracy theories and hopes to oversee the 2024 elections). Nevada is very important ahead of the Midterm elections as the GOP sees the possibility of ousting several Democrats, including Governor Steve Sisolak, three members of the House and Senator Catherine Cortez Masto. Also of great significance is the result in South Carolina, where Donald managed to “take revenge” on outgoing Congressman Tom Rice, who lost to rival Russell Fry. Rice was one of 10 Republicans who voted for impeachment, while the winner is a Trumpian. In the same state, the former president was unable to get rid of Nancy Mace, who had voted in favor of certifying Joe Biden’s victory and imposed herself on the challenger supported by the tycoon.

And in Texas, the Republicans have struck a big blow: in the by-election to replace Democratic Congressman Filemon Vela in a Hispanic majority college, the conservative Mayra Flores won, who will be the first exponent of the Grand Old Party in this electoral district and Texas’s first Latin Republican in Congress. In total, of the 13 candidates backed by Trump in Tuesday’s primary, about ten prevailed, most of whom espouse the stolen vote theory. And in total, according to a Washington Post survey, more than 100 Republican primary winners so far support the false allegations of electoral fraud. According to the newspaper, sharing this theory has become the price of having the tycoon endorsement and often mortgaging victory. The Democrats, on the other hand, hope to leverage the hearings of the Commission of Inquiry to try to keep the majority in one or both chambers in the mid-term elections, where with the approval of Biden in free fall and the surge in inflation that infuriates voters risk a debacle.

Precisely with regard to the hearings, Trump defined the works as a “parody of justice” and a “witch hunt”, stating that “all the acquittal witnesses”, that is, those in his favor, were excluded. On his social platform Truth, moreover, he also targeted his former Minister of Justice William Barr, who, according to him, “did not have the courage to prosecute electoral fraud because he was afraid of being impeached”. Barr’s deposition was actually very bad for the former president because he confirmed that he repeatedly assured him that his allegations of fraud on him were unfounded. “This farce is a shameless attempt to divert public attention from the truth – continued Trump – the Americans went en masse to Washington on January 6, 2021 to ask their elected officials for the obvious signs of criminal activity during the elections”.

The en plein of Trump’s “conspiracy theorists”. But the tycoon’s trial doesn’t stop